Srikanta Dash PhD

Srikanta Dash PhD

Professor of Pathology Director of Hepatitis Research Laboratory

Dr. Dash received his Ph.D from the All India Institute of Sciences, New Delhi, India in 1991. His graduate work involved characterizing a putative receptor of Hepatitis B virus envelope protein on human liver cells. Dr. Dash moved to Tulane as a post-doctoral fellow under Professor Michael A. Gerber. There he finished six years of post-doctoral training, working on Hepatitis C in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. In 1995 Dr. Dash was promoted to Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology.

Major Clinical and Teaching Responsibilities

  • Tulane Pathology Course for Medical Students (Sophomore Pathology) Lecturer, Disorders of the Immune System Hypersensitivity and Immune Mechanisms of Tissue Injury
  • Involved in Teaching Tulane Molecular and Cell Biology (MCB) Graduate Students (Research Methods)
  • Advanced Virology Course for Microbiology and Immunology, graduate students at Tulane year, 2015,2016, 2017, 2018
  • Graduate Students Training in Pathology Hepatitis Research Laboratory at Tulane
  • Medical Students Training
  • Pathology Resident Training
  • Mentoring Junior Faculty
  • Major Collaborations Inside and Outside Tulane

   Research

 

The liver is the largest solid organ of the human body. It is located on the right side of the abdomen behind the ribs. The liver is responsible for protein, carbohydrate, lipid metabolism, secretes bile, detoxifies harmful substances, purifies our blood, manufactures vital nutrients, and helps with blood clotting. The liver is often affected by primary malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (derived from hepatocytes) and cholangiocarcinoma (derived from bile ducts). According to the National Cancer Institute, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 4th common cancer in the world. It is also called primary liver cancer because it arises from hepatocyte, which is the major cell type of the liver. The cause of hepatocellular carcinoma is unknown but contributing factors include viral hepatitis (hepatitis B and hepatitis C), cirrhosis, hemochromatosis, and toxins (especially aflatoxins) found in foods in parts of Africa and Asia. This organ is also more frequently affected by secondary malignant diseases derived from a variety of cancers such as colorectal carcinoma, carcinomas of the stomach, pancreas, lungs, breast and malignant melanomas.

Hepatitis C virus is a blood borne infectious disease that affects the liver. The majority of people infected with this virus end up with a chronic infection.  Since the infection does not have any symptoms, many individuals do not know that they carry the virus until it has already done significant liver damage 10 to 20 years later. Chronic HCV infection damages the liver and causes liver cirrhosis and cancer.  There is no treatment for liver cirrhosis and cancer. Most of these patients seek liver transplantation. There are no vaccines available currently for the prevention of HCV infection. The FDA approved treatment for chronic HCV infection is alpha interferon, ribavirin along with one of the protease inhibitors. Many patients develop resistance to this interferon -based therapy. There are approximately 170 million people infected with HCV worldwide, including 1.7 million in the United States. The social, medical and economic burden of HCV infection is enormous. The molecular details of why some patients do not respond to standard interferon therapy are currently unknown. This could be partly related either to specific hepatitis C viral strains that show persistent infection in the liver by inhibiting interferon response, or defects in the host cell response to interferon. The patients who do not respond to interferon treatment, experience long-term inflammation of liver and are at increased risk of developing liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Pathology hepatitis research lab along with Dr. Balart and Dr. Schores investigate the cause of HCV resistance to current treatment. Research program focused on two major aspects of the disease namely: (i) To understand the mechanism of interferon resistance and virus persistence and to find out why some patients respond to treatment and why some do not. Understand how the IL-28B genotype contributes to the treatment clearance. (ii) We have developd alternative intracellular treatment approach using combinatorial siRNAs to treat chronic HCV infection that do not responds to interferon.

The mechanism(s) by which HCV cause liver cancer is complex. During the last few years our focus has been to prevent HCV-related hepatocellular carcinomas by developing an effective strategy to inhibit virus replication and production. We have been able to successfully grow hepatitis C virus outside the liver in a cell culture. We demonstrated that this culture is infectious since viral particles derived from HCV-cell culture cause persistent infection in a chimpanzee model. To visualize the replication of hepatitis C virus in living cells, scientists in our hepatitis research laboratory has fused it to green fluorescence protein in frame using one of the non-structural proteins of HCV (NS5A).  

Liver cells replicating this virus emit a green fluorescent signal when exposed to a specific wavelength of light. This allows direct visualization of the tiny microscopic viral factories inside the cells (see the picture on the left). HCV-cell culture models are currently being utilized in our laboratory to understand the antiviral action of interferon alpha and mechanisms of interferon and ribavirin resistance. We have developed an intracellular treatment approach to eliminate chronic infections using genetically engineered recombinant human antibodies targeted to the viral NS3 helicase enzyme and small hairpin RNAs targeted to the highly conserved 5'UTR region. In the future, our research will lead to an effective intracellular treatment approach for chronic hepatitis C patients who are not responding to interferon therapy. This will reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas due to hepatitis C. The hepatitis research laboratory is also conduct basic research to understand the mechanism of cancer metastasis to the liver (secondary liver cancer) in order to develop effective therapeutic strategy that will prevent secondary liver cancer. The significance of these accomplishments has been recognized by my peers through the publication records and continuous support from the National Cancer Institute for the laboratory.

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Publications  

Invited Lectures

  1. Mechanisms of interferon action and resistance: lessons learned from HCV cell cultures, delivered lecture at National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Indian Council of Medical Research, Kolkata, India, July 14th, 2008
  2. Mouse Model for Hepatitis C virus Replication, International Liver Congress at Hong Kong, June 12-14, 2008
  3. Co-chair, Oral session: Hepatitis C: Experimental Therapies at 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Dallas, 1999, Hepatology, October 1999, 30:122A
  4. Invited Speaker for the International Minicourse Tools to Unravel Viral Dyanamics in the Caribbean Basin, University of Costa Rica, Sponsored by The American Society of Microbiology, July 11-23, 2005.
  5. Invited Speaker for the International Symposium Virus and Neoplasia Symposium at the Universidad Techologica de Santiago Medical School, in Santiago, the Dominican Republic, Nov-1-4, 2002.
  6. Hepatitis C: After the NIH Consensus Conference: New Directions,1997 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Chicago, IL
  7. International Business Communications (IBC) Fourth Annual International Industry Congress on Hepatitis January 22-23, 1998, Washington DC, Establishment of Cell Culture Systems for Hepatitis C Virus
  8. New Orleans Virology Association (NOVA), Seminar, Department of Microbiology, LSU Medical Center, LA, May, 1997.
  9. Seminar on Replication of HCV in Cell Culture July 1999 at the Department of Microbiology Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR
  10. Replication of Hepatitis C Virus in Cell Culture October 13, 1999, Seminar at the Liver Research Center Department of Medicine Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, New Y ork
  11. HCV Cell Culture Models, Seminar, June 12, 2000 Wyeth-Ayerst Research and Pharmaceutical Company, Pearl River, NY
  12. In vitro models to study HCV replication Department of Pathology Ground Rounds, May 16, 2001 Northwestern School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
  13. Antiviral properties of interferon and recombinant antibodies in HCV cell culture, Veterinary School of Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA, April 15,2004
  14. Hepatitis C virus and hepatocellular carcinoma, Invited speaker at the LSU, Department of Microbiology, New Orleans, Nov.16, 2004
  15. Invited Speaker at the Ochsner Clinic Foundation Hepatocarcinogenesis Secondary to Hepatitis C Virus Infection, March 16, 2007.
  16. Invited Speaker: Mechanisms of interferon action and resistance: lessons learned from HCV cell cultures at the Albert-Einstein College of Medicine, New York, April 9, 2008
  17. Tulane Pharmacology Department Grand Rounds November, 1997, HCV Replication in Cell Culture
  18. Tulane Pathology Department Grand Rounds, January 1998 Clinical and Biological Significance of Hepatitis Viruses
  19. Tulane Microbiology and Immunology Grand Round, March, 1998, HCV Cell Cultures.
  20. Cell Culture Assay for Hepatitis C Virus, Seminar, Tulane Cancer Center, January 21st, 1999, New Orleans, LA
  21. In vitro models to study HCV replication. Seminar, May 31st, 2001 Infectious Disease Section AIDS Clinical Trial Units Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Tulane
  22. Strategies to prevent liver cancer secondary to chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Grand Round on Friday, February 4, 2005
  23. Mechanism of interferon action and resistance in chronic hepatitis C. Physiology Department, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, December 4, 2006
  24. Mechanisms of interferon action and resistance: lessons learned from HCV cell cultures, Pathology Grand Round, June 6, 2008.
  25. Hepatitis C virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Grant Round at Biochemistry at LSU in the year 2010.
  26. Hepatitis C virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invited talk at the Ochsner Clinic in the year 2011.
  27. Anatomy Department Seminar at Tulane University School of Medicine, Hepatitis C virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinomas, November, 2012.
  28. Pathology Grand Round at Tulane University School of Medicine: Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma, January 4th, 2013.
  29. Pathology Grand Round at Tulane School of Medicie: Hepatitis C virus infection, autophagy and hepatocellular carcinoma: A weighty connection. January 6, 2017.

Original Manuscripts, Letters and Commentaries

  1. Dash S, Panda SK and Nayak NC. Polymerized albumin binding of HBsAg: an indicator of infectivity in hepatitis B virus carrier mothers. Hepatology (RLR), Sept 1988; Vol 18(9): P 114-115.
  2. Panda S K, Datta R, Dash S, Kaur J and Nayak NC. Recovery of virus-like agents from the faces of cases in an epidemic of non-A, non-B viral hepatitis in South Delhi. Hepatology (RLR), 1987; Vol 17(4): P46-49.
  3. Dash S, Panda SK and Nayak NC. Polymerized albumin binding to serum in various liver diseases: its significance and relation to hepatitis B virus infection. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 1990; 5:17-25.
  4. Dash S, Rao KVS, Joshi B, Nayak NC and Panda SK. Significance of natural polymerized albumin and its receptor in hepatitis B infection of hepatocytes. Hepatology, 1991; 13:134- 142.
  5. Dash S, Rao KVS and Panda SK. Identification of receptor for pre-S1(21-47) component of hepatitis B virus on liver cell: Role in virus cell interaction. Journal of Medical Virology, 1992; 37(2): 116-121.
  6. Akyol G, Dash S, Sheih C, Malter J S and Gerber MA. Detection of hepatitis C virus sequences by polymerase chain reaction in fixed tissue. Modern Pathology, 1992; 5(5): 501-504.
  7. Gerber MA, Sheih C, Shim K-S, Thung SN, Demetris AJ, Schwartz M, Akyol G, and Dash S. Detection of replicative hepatitis C virus sequences in hepatocellular carcinoma. American Journal of Pathology, 1992; 141: 1271-1277.
  8. Balart LA, Roddenberry J, Perrillo R, Rogemstein F, Shim K-S, Sheih C, Taylor B, Dash S and Gerber MA. Hepatitis C viral RNA in liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after treatment with alpha-interferon. Gastroenterology, 1992; 104:1472-1477.
  9. Chu H-W, Dash S and Gerber MA. Chronic hepatitis C: Histological activity and replication of hepatitis C virus. Human Pathology, 1994; 25:160-163.
  10. Hytiroglou P, Dash S, Haruna Y, Fernandez M, Theise N D, Schwartz M, Miller C, Bodenheimer H C, Thung S N and Gerber MA. Detection of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viral sequences in fulminant hepatic failure of unknown etiology. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 1995; 104: 588-593.
  11. Lei D, Wu J, Sullivan D E, Dash S and Gerber MA. Detection of hepatitis B virus sequences in liver tissue of seronegative organ-donors. International Hepatology Communication, 1995; 3:154-160.
  12. Hiramatsu N, Dash S and Gerber MA. Development of an efficient HCV cDNA transfer in vitro. Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 1997; 4: 61-67.
  13. Sullivan D, Dash S, Du H, Hiramatsu H, Aydin F, Koll J, Blanchard J, Baskin G and Gerber MA. Liver directed gene transfer in non-human Primates. Human Gene Therapy, 1997; 8:1195-1206.
  14. Dash S, Hiramatsu N and Gerber M A. Technical Advance: Transfection of HepG2 cells with infectious hepatitis C virus Genome. American Journal of Pathology, 1997;151:363- 373.
  15. Halim A-B, Garry RF, Dash S and Gerber MA. Effect of Schistosomiasis and Hepatitis on Liver Disease. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 1999; 60: 915-920.
  16. Karavattathayyil S, Kalkeri G, Gaglio P, Garry RF, Krause J and Dash S. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA sequences in B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2000; 113:391-398.
  17. Dash S, Rege TA, Tsuji H, Gaglio P, Garry RF, Saxena R and Thung SN. HCV RNA levels in hepatocellular carcinomas and adjacent non-tumorous livers. Journal of Virological Methods, 2000; 90 (1): 15-23.
  18. Gaglio PJ, Baskin G, Bohm R, Blanchard J, Cheng S, Dunne B, Davidson J, Liu H and Dash S. Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in Rhesus Macaques (Maccaca Mulatta): novel approach for study of liver regeneration. Comparative Medicine, 2000; August; 50 (4): 363-368.
  19. Lu H, Ye MQ, Thung SN, Gerber MA and Dash S. Hepatitis C virus RNA sequences in Cholangiocarcinoma. Chinese Journal of Medicine, 2000; 113(12): 1138-1141.
  20. Dash S, Kalkeri G, McClure HM, Garry RF, Clejan S, Thung SN and Murthy K. Transmission of HCV to a chimpanzee using virus particles produced in an RNA- transfected HepG2 cell culture. Journal of Medical Virology, 2001; 65:276-281.
  21. Kalkeri G, Khalap N, Garry R, Fermin CD and Dash S. Hepatitis C virus protein expression induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Virology, 2001; 282(1): 26-37.
  22. Myung J, Khalap N, Kalkeri G, Garry R and Dash S. Inducible model to study negative strand RNA synthesis and assembly of hepatitis C virus from a full-length cDNA clone. Journal of Virological Methods, 2001; 94 (1-2): 55-67.
  23. Kalkeri G, Khalap N, Garry R, Fermin C and Dash S. Hepatitis C viral proteins affect cell viability and membrane permeability. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2001, 71; 194-208.
  24. Lu H, Sullivan D, Gerber MA and Dash S. Adenovirus induced acute hepatitis in non- human primates after liver directed gene therapy. Chinese Medical Journal, 2002: 115(5): 726-731.
  25. Gaglio PJ, Liu H, Dash S, Cheng S, Dunne B, Raterree M, Baskin G, Blanchard J, Bohm R, Theise N and Labrecque D. Liver regeneration investigated in a non-human primate model. Journal of Hepatology, 2002; 37(5): 625-632.
  26. Sullivan D, Mondelli M U, Curiel DT, Krasnykh V, Mikheeva G, Gaglio P, Morris CB, Dash S and Gerber MA. Construction and characterization of an intracellular single- chain human antibody to hepatitis c virus nonstructural 3 protein. Journal of Hepatology, 2002; 37(5): 660-668.
  27. Qi Z, Kalkeri G, Hanible J, Prabhu R, Bastian F, Garry RF and Dash S. Stem-loop structures (II-IV) of the 5’ untranslated sequences are required for the expression of the full-length hepatitis C virus genome. Archives of Virology, 2003; 148(3): 449-467.
  28. Akhter S, Liu H, Prabhu R, DeLuca C, Bastian F, Garry RF, Thung SN and Dash S. Epstein-Barr virus and human hepatocellular carcinoma. Cancer Letters, 2003; 192:49-
  29. Robert Garry and Srikanta Dash. Proteomics computational analysis suggests that hepatitis C virus E1 and pestivirus E2 envelope glycoproteins are truncated class II fusion protein. Virology, 2003; 307(2): 255-265.
  30. Prabhu R, Garry RF, Bastian F, Haque S, Regenstein F, Thung SN and Dash S. Interferon alpha-2b inhibits negative strand RNA and protein expression from a full-length HCV1a clone. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2004; 76(3): 242-252.
  31. Frank O Bastian, Srikanta Dash and Robert F Garry. Linking chronic wasting disease to scrapie by comparison of Spiroplasma mirium ribosomal DNA sequences. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2004; 77: 49-56.
  32. Prabhu R, Khalap N, R. Burioni, Clementei M, Garry RF and Dash S. Inhibition of non-structural protein, helicase activity and viral replication by a recombinant human antibody clone. American Journal of Pathology, 2004; 165:1163-1173.
  33. Buza N, Lagarde DC, Dash S and Haque S. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: report of a single organ involvement in a child. Journal of Cellular Molecular Medicine, 2004; 8(3): 397- 401.
  34. Dash S, Shah K, Prabhu R, Deluca C, Bastian F, Garry RF, Haque S, Joshi B, Thung SN and Regenstein F. Interferon alpha, beta, gamma each inhibits hepatitis C virus replication at the levels of internal ribosome entry site mediated translation. Liver International, 2005,25(3): 580-594.
  35. Mirabel R. S. M. Pai, Ramesh Prabhu, Alfredo Panebra, Sarah Nangle, Frank Bastian, Robert Garry, Krishna Agrawal, Steve Goodbourn and Srikanta Dash. Activation of Interferon Stimulated Response Element in a Huh-7 cell line replicating hepatitis C virus sub-genomic RNA. Intervirology, 2005, Sept-Oct 48(5): 301-311.
  36. Prabhu R, Viral P, Yin Q, Flemington E, Garry RF, Bastian F and Dash S. Small interfering RNA mediated inhibition of hepatitis C virus gene expression. Journal of Medical Virology, 2005, 76:511-519.
  37. Dash S, Haque S, Joshi V, Prabhu R, Hazari S, Fermin C and Garry RF. Review on HCV- related hepatocellular carcinoma: new findings and hope for effective treatment. Microscopy Research and Technique, 2005,68: 130-148.
  38. Bastian FO, McDermott ME, Perry AS, Carver LA, Dash S and Garry RF. Safe method for isolation of prion protein and diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Journal Virological Methods, 2005,130:133-139.
  39. Sidhartha Hazari, Asha Patel, Ramesh Prabhu, Frank Bastian, Robert Garry, Virendra Joshi, Salima Haque, Fredric G. Regenstein, Richard Elliot, and Srikanta Dash. Interferon alpha inhibits internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of green fluorescence protein from six different HCV genotypes. Journal of General Virology, 2005,86:3047-3053.
  40. Prabhu R, Garry RF and Dash S. SiRNA targeted to the stem-loop II of the 5’ untranslated region inhibits expression of six major HCV genotypes. Virology Journal, 2006, 3:100.
  41. Hazari S, Taylor L, Haque S, Garry RF, Florman S, Luftig R, Regenstein F and Dash S. Reduced expression of Jak-1 and Tyk-2 proteins leads to interferon resistance in hepatitis C virus replicon. Virology Journal, 2007; 18: 89.
  42. Dash S, Hazari S, Garry RF and Regenstein F. Book Chapter 2: Mechanisms of interferon action and resistance in chronic hepatitis C: lessons learned from cell culture studies. Edited by Emerilo Jirilo, MD, Springer Publishing Company, Hepatitis C virus Disease: Immunology and Clinical Applications, 2008.
  43. Pamuja S, Hazari S, Bolden G, Graves RA, Dakshina M, Chinta DMD, Dash S, Kishore V and Mandal T. Preparation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of surface modified poly (lactide- co-glycolide) fluorescent nanoparticles. Journal Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 2010,62:422-429.
  44. Sidhartha Hazari, Partha K Chandra, Bret Poat, Sibnarayan Data, Robert F Garry, Timothy P Foster, Gus Kousoulas, Takaji Wakita and Srikanta Dash. Impaired antiviral activity of interferon alpha against hepatitis C virus 2a in Huh-7 cells with a defective Jak-Stat pathway. Virology Journal, 2010,7:36.
  45. Kundu AK, Hazari S, Chinta DD, Pramer YV, Dash S and Mandal TK. Development of nanosome using high-pressure homogenization for gene therapy. J Pharmacy and Pharmacology 2010,62:1101-1111.
  46. Chandra PK, Hazari S, Poat B, Gunduz F, Prabhu R, Liu G, Burioni R, Clementi M, Garry RF and Dash S. Intracytoplasmic stable expression of IgG1 antibody targeting NS3 helicase inhibits replication of highly efficient hepatitis C Virus 2a clone. Virology Journal, 2010; 7:118.
  47. Poat B, Hazari S, Chandra PK, Gunduz F, Garry RF and Dash S. Intracellular expression of IRF-9 Stat fusion protein overcome defective Jak-Stat signaling and inhibits HCV RNA replication. Virology Journal 2010,7:265.
  48. Raychoudhury A, Srivastava S, Steele R, Dash S, Kanda T, Ray R and Ray R. Hepatitis C virus infection impairs IRF-7 translocation and IFN-a synthesis in immortalized human hepatocytes. Journal of Virology, 2010, 84(21): 10991-10998.
  49. Poat B,Hazari S, Chandra P, Gunduz F, Balart L and Dash S. SH2 modified STAT1 induces HLA-1 expression and improves IFN-gamma signaling and inhibits HCV RNA replication. PLoS ONE, 2010,5(9): e13117.
  50. Hazari S, Hefler HJ, Chandra PK, Poat B, Gunduz F, Ooms T, Wu T, Balart LA, Dash S. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenograft Supports HCV Replication: A Mouse Model for Evaluating Antivirals. World J Gastroenterology, 2011 2011,17(3): 300-312.
  51. Bao L, Haque A, Jackson K, Hazari S, Moroz K, Jetley R and Dash S. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein is associated with doxorubicin chemoresistance in 4T1 metastatic breast cancer model. American Journal of Pathology 2011,178 (2): 838-852.
  52. Datta S, Hazari S, Chandra PK,Samara M, Poat B, Gunduz F, Wimley WC, Hauser H, Koster M, Lamaze C, Balart L, Garry RF and Dash S. Mechanisms of HCV’s resistance to IFN-alpha in cell culture involves expression of functional IFN-alpha receptor 1. Virology Journal 2011,8:351.
  53. Wang Y, Shenouda S, Baranwal S, Rathinam R, Jain P, Bao L, Hazari S, Dash S and Alahari S. Integrin subunit alpha5 and alpha 6 regulate cell cycle by modulating the chk1 and Rb/E2F pathway to effect breast cancer metastasis. Molecular Cancer 2011,10:84.
  54. Kundu AK, Chandra PK, Hazari S, Pramer YV, Dash S and Mandal TK. Development and 16optimization of nanosomal formulations for siRNA delivery to the liver. Eur J Pharm Biopharm 2012,80(2): 257-267.
  55. Kundu AK, Chandra PK, Hazari S, Ledet G, Pramer YV, Dash S and Mandal TK. Stability of lyophilized siRNA-nanosome formulations. International J of Pharmacy 2012,423 (2): 525-534.
  56. Pamuja S, Hazari S, Bolden G, Graves RA, Chinta DD, Dash S, Kishore V, Mandal TK. Cellular delivery of Pegylated PLGA nanoparticles. Journal Pharmacy Pharmacology, 2012; 64: 61-67.
  57. Bao L, Hazari S, Mehra S, Kaushal D, Mporoz K and Dash S. Increased expression of P- glycoprotein and doxorubicin chemoresistance of metastatic breast cancer is regulated by miR-298. American Journal of Pathology 2012,180:2490-2503.
  58. Chandra PK, Kundu AK, Hazari S, Chandra S, Bao L, Ooms T, Morris GF, Wu T, Mandal TK and Dash S. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication by intracellular delivery of multiple siRNAs by nanosomes. Molecular Therapy 2012, 20 (9): 1724-36.
  59. Gunduz F, Aboulnasr FM, Chandra PK, Hazari S, Poat B, Baker DP, Balart LA and Dash S. Free fatty acids induce ER stress and block antiviral activity of interferon alpha against hepatitis C virus in cell culture. Virology Journal, 2012,9:143.
  60. Song K, Han C, Zhang J, Lu D, Dash S, Feitelson M, Lim K, Wu T. Epigenetic regulation of miR-122 by PPARgamma and hepatitis B virus X protein in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Hepatology 2013,58:1681-1692.
  61. Panigrahi R, Hazari S, Chandra S, Chandra PK, Datta S, Kurt R, Cameron CE, Huang Z, Zhang H, Garry RF, Balart LA and Dash S. Interferon and ribavirin combination treatment synergistically inhibit HCV internal ribosome entry site mediated translation at the level of polyribosome formation. PLOS One, 2013,8:e72791.
  62. Gunduz F, Mallikarjun C, Balart LA and Dash S. Interferon alpha induced intrahepatic pSTAT1 inversely correlates with serum HCV RNA levels in chronic HCV infection. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2014; 96:36-41.
  63. Bao L,Chandra PK, Moroz K, Zhang X, Thung SN, Wu T and Dash S. Impaired autophagy response in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2014,96:149-154.
  64. Chandra PK, Bao L, Song K, Aboulnasr FM, Baker DP, Shores N, Wimley WC, Liu S, Hagedorn CH, Fuchs SY, Wu T, Balart LA and Dash S.. HCV infection selectively impairs Type I but not the Type III IFN signaling. American Journal of Pathology, 2014; 184:214- 229.
  65. McCarthy M, Auda G, Agrawal S, Taylor A, Backstrom Z, Mondal D, Moroz K, Dash S. In vivo anticancer synergy mechanism of doxorubicin and verapamil combination treatment is impaired in Balb/c mice with metastatic cancer. Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 2014,97:6-15.
  66. Sabahi A, Uprichard S, Wimley W, Dash S, and Garry R. Unexpected structural features of the hepatitis c virus envelope protein 2 ectodomain. Journal of Virology, 2014; 88: 10280- 10288.
  67. Chandra PK, Gunduz F, Hazari S, Ramazan K, Panigrahi R, Poat B, Bruce D, Cohen AJ, Behorquez HE, Carmody I, Loss G, Balart LA, Wu T and Dash S. Impaired expression of type I and type II interferon receptors in HCV-associated chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis. PLOS ONE, 2014; 9:e108616.
  68. Panigrahi R, Chandra PK, Ferraris P, Kurt R, Song K, Garry RF, Reiss K, Imogen Coe I, Furihata T, Balart LA, Wu T, Dash S. Persistent HCV infection impairs ribavirin antiviral activity through clathrin mediated trafficking of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1. Journal of Virology, 2015; 89: 626-642.
  69. Liu J, Boonkaew B, Arora J, Mandava SH, Maddox MM, Chava S, Callaghan C, He J, Dash S, John VT and Lee BR. Comparison of Sorafenib-loaded Poly (Lactic/Glycolic) Acid and DPPC liposome nanoparticles in the in vitro treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2015; 104: 1187-1196.
  70. Kurt R, Chandra PK, Aboulnasr F, Panigrahi R, Ferraris P, Aydin Y, Reiss K, Wu T, Balart LA and Dash S. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV cell culture. PLOS One, 2015; 10(5): e0125962.
  71. Donna P, Zahra H, Dash S and Tarr M. Hybrid Paclitaxel and Gold Nanorod-Loaded Human Serum Albumin Nanoparticles for Simultaneous Chemotherapeutic and Photothermal Therapy on 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2015; 7:7101-7011.
  72. Song K, Han C, Dash S, Balart LA and Wu T. MiR-122 in hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus dual infection. World Journal of Hepatology, 2015; 7: 498-506.
  73. Panigrani R and Dash S. Editorial: ENT1and treatment of viral diseases. Oncotarget, 2015; 6: 32281-82.
  74. Aboulnasr F, Hazari S , Nayak S , Chandra PK , Panigrahi R, Ferraris P, Chava S , Kurt R , Song K, Dash A, Balart LA, Garry RF, Tong Wu and Dash S. IFN-λ inhibits MiR-122 transcription through a Stat3-HNF4α inflammatory feedback loop in an IFN-α resistant HCV cell culture system. PLOS One, 2015; 10: e0141655.
  75. Kwon H, Song K, Han C, Chen W, Wang Y, Dash S, Lim K and Wu T. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling ameliorates hepatic inflammation in mice with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hepatology, 2015;63(4):1155-1169.
  76. Dash S, Chava S, Chandra PK, Aydin Y, Balart LA and Wu T. Autophagy in hepatocellular carcinomas: from pathophysiology to therapeutic responses. Hepatic Medicine, 2016 Feb 22; 8:9-20.
  77. Song K, Kwon H, Han C, Zhang J, Dash S, Lim K and Wu T. Active glycolytic metabolism in CD133 (+) hepatocellular cancer stem cells: regulation by miR-122. Oncotarget, 2015 Dec 1; 6(38): 40822-35.
  78. Ferraris P, Chandra PK, Panigrahi R, Aboulnasr F, Chava S, Kurt R, Pawlotsky J-M, Wilkens L,OsterlundP,HartmannR,BalartLA,WuTandDashS. Cellular mechanism for impaired HCV clearance by IFN associated with IL-28B gene polymorphisms relate to intrahepatic IFN-lambda expression. American J of Pathology, 2016; 186 (4):938-951.
  79. Callaghan C, Peralta D, Liu J, Mandava SH, Maddox M, Dash S, Tarr MA and Lee B. Combined Treatment of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Labeled Gold Nanorod Encapsulated Albumin with Laser Thermal Ablation in a Renal Cell Carcinoma Model. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2016;105:284-292.
  80. Daniel J Klionsky et al. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy. Autophagy, 2016; 12: 1-222.
  81. Dash S, Chava S, Aydin Y, Chandra P, Ferraris P, Chen W, Balart LA, Wu T and Garry RF. Review: Hepatitis C virus infection induces autophagy as a pro-survival mechanism to alleviate hepatic ER-stress response. Viruses, 2016 May 23; 8(5).
  82. Zhang J, Baddoo M, Han C, Strong MJ, Cvitanovic J, Moroz K, Dash S, Flemington EK and Wu T. Gene network analysis reveals a novel 22-gene signature of carbon metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma. Oncotarget, 2016;7(31):49232-49245.
  83. Powell D, Chandra S, Dodson K, Shaheen F, Wilt K, Ireland S, Syed M, Dash S, Weise T, Mandal T and Kundu A. Aptamer-functionalized hybrid nanoparticle for the treatment of breast cancer. European J Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 2017;114:108-118.
  84. Chava S, Lee C, Aydin Y, Chandra PK, Dash A, Chedid M, Thung SN, Nayak NC, Wu T and Dash S. Chaperone-mediated autophagy compensate for impaired macroautophagy in the cirrhotic liver to promote hepatocellular carcinoma. Oncotarget, 2017;8(25): 40019- 40036.
  85. Aydin Y, Chatterjee A, Chandra PK, Chava S, Chen W, tendon A, Dash A, Chedid M, Moehlen MW, Regenstein F, Balart LA, Cohen A, Lu H, Wu T and Dash S. Interferon- alpha induced hepatitis C virus clearance restores p53 tumor suppressor more than direct- acting antivirals. Hepatology Communication, 2017; 1:256-269.
  86. Yucel Aydin, Milad Chedid, Srinivas Chava, Donkita Danielle Williams, Shuanghu Liu, Curt H Hagedorn, Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, Krzysztof Reiss , Luis A Balart, Hua Lu, and Srikanta Dash.. Activation of PERK-Nrf2 oncogenic signaling promotes Mdm2- mediated Rb degradation in persistently infected HCV culture. Scientific Report, 2017 Aug 23;7(1):9223.
  87. Maziveyi M, Subramaniam V, Dash S and Alahari, SK. Altered Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Signaling Between High and Low Metastatic Carcinoma Clones Derived from a Single Tumor. Journal of Comprehensive Cancer Research, 2017; 1: 1-12 (article ID100005).
  88. Yucel Aydin , Srinivas Chava, Rajesh Panigrahi , Donkita Danielle, Williams, Kylar Wiltz , Zahra Heidari , Krzysztof Moroz, and Srikanta Dash. Activation of PERK-Nrf2 oncogenic signaling induces autophagy shift in persistently infected HCV culture. Autophagy, 2018, (under review).
  89. Zhang Y, Zahra H, Yang S, Yu T, Xuan S, Omarova M, Aydin Y, Dash S, Zhang D and John V. Amphiphillic polypetoids rupture vesicle bilayers to form peptoid-lipid rafts effective in enhancing hydrophobic drug delivery. Soft Matter, 2018; (under review).

Commentaries

  1. Commented in WIRED NEWS by Writer Sam Jaffe regarding a scientific article published in July 2005 issue of Nature Biotechnology by SIRNA Therapeutics, Colorado based company that developed siRNA to treat hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection.

Book Chapters

  1. Springer Publishing Company, Hepatitis C virus Disease: Immunology and Clinical Applications, 2008 Edited by Emerilo Jirilo, MD. Dash S, Hazari S, Garry RF and Regenstein F. Mechanisms of interferon action and resistance in chronic hepatitis C: lessons learned from cell culture studies Chapter-II, Page 16-38.
  2. CRC Press Publishing Company: Cancer Causing Viruses and Their Inhibitors, Editor: Satya Gupta. Chapter 4: Mechanisms of hepatitis C virus clearance by interferon and ribavirin combination: lessons learned from in vitro cell culture.
  3. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., Hauppauge, NY, USA; Advances in studies on enzyme inhibitors as drugs, Editor Satya Gupta. Chapter: MAPK inhibitors for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma by Dash S, Chava S, Aydin Y, Buell JJ, Wu T, Cohen AJ, Balart LA.
  4. Elsevier Book: Viral Polymerases, San Diego, CA. Editor Satya Gupta. Chapter 5: Hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA polymerase inhibitors: an integral part of HCV antiviral therapy by Srikanta Dash, Yucel Aydin and Stephens Christopher.

United States Patents

  1. Falvivirus Fusion Inhibitors
  2. Hepatitis C virus Clearance by combination siRNA treatment.

Abstracts Presented at the National and International Meetings

  1. Dash S, Panda SK and Nayak NC. Hepatitis B virus receptor. International Conference on Molecular Immunology, Organized by Department of Biotechnology, AIIMS, New Delhi, 1990.
  2. Dash S, Rao KVS and Panda SK. Hepatitis B virus and liver cell interaction. VIIth Biennial Scientific Meeting of Asian Pacific Association for the Study of Liver. Jakarta, February 19- 21,1990.
  3. Dash S, Rao KVS and Panda SK. Hepatitis B virus liver cell interaction. Indo-US Vaccine Action Program, Workshop on New Developments in Vaccinology, New Delhi, jointly sponsored by Department of Biotechnology, Government of India and US Agency for International Development and US Public Health Service, Oct. 24-26, 1989, P20-24.
  4. Dash S, Rao KVS and Panda SK. Hepatitis B Virus Liver Cell Interaction. Indo-UK Symposium, Updates in Viral Hepatitis, Organized by Department of Microbiology. Dr. A.L. Mudaliar Post-Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, India, Taramani, 9th January 1990; P90 102.
  5. Dash S and Gerber MA. Characterization of the pre-S1 (21-47) receptor for hepatitis B virus. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Postgraduate Course, & 43rd Annual Meeting, October 31-3rd, November 1992, Chicago Marriott Hotel, Chicago, Illinois.
  6. Sullivan D, Sheih CYS, Dash S and Gerber MA. Hepatitis C virus RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma and liver tissue. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Postgraduate Course, & 43rd Annual meeting, October 31-3rd November 1992, Chicago Marriott Hotel, Chicago, Illinois.
  7. Dash S and Gerber MA. Chronic hepatitis C: histological activity and replication of hepatitis C virus was presented at the US and Canadian Academy of Pathology 1993 meeting, New Orleans, LA.
  8. Dash S and Gerber MA. Hepatocyte receptor for hepatitis B virus. Platform Presentation at the FASEB Meeting at the New Orleans, April 1-5,1993.
  9. Dash S and Gerber MA. Receptor for pre-S1 for hepatitis B virus. Presented at the Molecular Biology of Hepatitis B Virus Meeting at Washington DC, August 1-5,1993.
  10. Dash S and Gerber MA. Hepatocyte Receptor for Hepatitis B Virus. Presented at the American Gastroenterology Association (AGA) Meeting at New Orleans, 1994, May 15-18.
  11. Sullivan D, Dash S, Du H, Hiramatsu N, Gerber MA, Kolls J, Blanchard J, Baskin G. Gene therapy studies in non-human primates. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease Meeting at Chicago, Nov. 3-7, 1995.
  12. Baskin G, Blanchard J, Sullivan D, Dash S and Gerber MA. Preclinical studies of liver directed gene therapy in non-human primates. Presented at the13th European Congress on Veterinary Pathology, 27-30th September 1995 at Scotland.
  13. Dash S, Hiramatsu N, Sullivan D, and Gerber MA. Development of an HCV replication system in HepG2 cells by transfection with HCV RNA. Oral Presentation at the plenary session of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Digestive Diseases Week, May 19-22, San Francisco, California.
  14. Hiramatsu N, Dash S, Sullivan D, E. Atillasoy, Thung SN, Miller CM and Gerber MA. Detection of Hepatitis G Virus (HGV) Sequences in Liver Tissues of Patients with Fulminant Hepatic Failure. Presentation at the poster session of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Digestive Diseases Week, May 19-22, San Francisco, California.
  15. Hiramatsu N, Dash S, Sullivan D, E. and Gerber MA. Development of efficient HCV cDNA transfer in vitro. Presentation at the poster session of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), Digestive DiseasesWeek, May19-22, San Francisco, California.
  16. Dash S, N Hiramatsu N, Sullivan D and Gerber MA. Long term replication of hepatitis C virus in Daudi cells after HCV RNA transfection. Presentation at the poster session of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), 47th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Nov 8-12,1996. Selected for poster discussion.
  17. Kalkeri G, El-haroon A, Garry RF and Dash S. Characterization of apoptosis in HCV cell cultures. Hepatology 1998; 28:182A, Poster presentation at the International Association for the study of liver, Biennial Scientific meeting and 49th annual meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), Chicago, November 4-10, 1998.
  18. Dash S, Rege TA, Tsuji H, Gaglio P, Garry RF, Saxena R and Thung SN. Quantitative comparison of the levels of HCV in hepatocellular carcinoma and corresponding non- tumorous liver.Hepatology 1998,28:278A. Poster presentation at the International Association for the study of liver, Biennial scientific meeting and 49th Annual Meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), Chicago, November 4-10, 1998.
  19. Karavattathayyil S, Kalkeri G, Gaglio P, Garry RF, Krauss J and Dash S. Detection of Hepatitis C virus RNA sequences in-patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Hepatology 1998; 28:278. Poster presentation at the International Association for the study of liver, Biennial Scientific Meeting and 49th annual meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), Chicago, November 4-10, 1998.
  20. Dash S, Huang L, Kalkeri G, Gaglio PJ and Garry R. Assembly of virus-like particles in cells transfected with full-length HCV RNA derived from infectious HCV cDNA clones. 6th international Symposium on Hepatitis C and Related Viruses: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, June 6-9, 1999.
  21. Sullivan D, deHaard H, Krasnykh V, Mikheeva G, Curiel D, Mondelli M, Gaglio P, Dash S and Gerber MA. Adenoviral mediated expression of anti-HCV NS3 single chain antibody reduces HCV RNA in infected hepatocytes. Platform presentation 6th international Symposium on Hepatitis C and Related Viruses: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and June 6-9, 1999.
  22. Kalkeri G, Haroon A, Garry R, Dash S and Gerber MA. In vitro model for studying pathogenesis of HCV. 6th international Symposium on Hepatitis C and Related Viruses: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, June 6-9, 1999.
  23. Dash S, Huang Li, Kalkeri G, Gaglio PJ and Garry R. Assembly of virus-like particles in cells transfected with full-length HCV RNA derived from infectious HCV cDNA clones. Hepatology 1999, 30: 204: A174. 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease,Dallas, Texas, November 5-9, 1999.
  24. Gaglio PJ, Dash S, Liu H, Cheng S, Dunne B, Baskin G, Boehm R and Blanchard J. Liver Regeneration Investigated in a Primate Model. Hepatology, 1999; 30:256: A383. 50th Annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Dallas, Texas, November 5-9, 1999.
  25. Kalkeri G, Garry R, Dash S and Gerber MA. Construction of chimeric clone with full-length HCV cDNA and green fluorescence protein. Hepatology, 1999;30:A780. 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Dallas, Texas, November 5-9, 1999.
  26. Sullivan D, deHaard H, Krasnykh V, Mikheeva G, Curiel D, Mondelli M, Gaglio PJ, Dash S and Gerber MA. Intracellular single chain antibodies (scFv) to HCV non-structural proteins as anti-viral agents. Hepatology 1999, 30; 409: A993. Platform presentation at the50th Annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Dallas, Texas, November 5-9, 1999.
  27. Gaglio P, Rubio M, Liu H and Dash S. Liver regeneration is impaired in-patients with hepatitis C induced cirrhosis and alcohol abuse. Hepatology , 1999; 30: 595;A1740. 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Dallas, Texas, November 5-9, 1999.
  28. Myung J, Kalkeri G, Garry R and Dash S. Replication and assembly of hepatitis C virus from a full-length cDNA clone pMO9.6-T7 using an adenovirus that expresses T7 RNA polymerase. Poster presentation at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology Annual Meeting at New Orleans, March 25-31, 2000.
  29. Myung J, Garry R and Dash S. Replication of a chimpanzee infectious clones in cell culture using a replication defective adenovirus that express T7 RNA polymerase. Platform presentation at the DDW-Meeting, 2000, May 21st, San Diego, CA.
  30. Kalkeri G, Garry RF and Dash S. Expression of HCV-GFP chimera in Huh-7 cells leads to apoptotic cell death. Poster Presented at the 10th International Symposium on Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease, Atlanta USA April 9-13, 2000.
  31. Myung J, Garry RF and Dash S. Inducible model to study negative strand RNA synthesis and assembly of hepatitis C virus from infectious full-length clones. Poster presented at the 10th International Symposium on Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease, Atlanta USA April 9-13, 2000.
  32. Kalkeri G, Garry RF and Dash S. Expression of HCV-GFP chimera in Huh-7 cells leads to apoptotic cell death. Poster presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, October 27-31, 2000,Dallax, Texas.
  33. Dash S, KK Murthy, Kalkeri G, Garry RF and Thung SN. Transmission of hepatitis C virus to a chimpanzee with virus-like particles produced from HepG2 cells transfected with in vitro transcribed full-length RNA. Poster presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, October 27-31, 2000,Dallax, and Texas.
  34. Khalap N, Burioni R, Clementi M and Dash S. A recombinant human Fab inhibits helicase activity and HCV negative strand RNA synthesis. Platform presentation at the Experimental Biology Meeting, 2001, March 31-April 4, Orlando, Florida.
  35. Dash S, Hanible J and Prabhu R. The highly conserved 98 nucleotides are essential for the establishment of stable Huh-7 cell lines replicating full-length HCV genome. Abstract submitted, 8th International Symposium on Hepatitis C and Related Disorders.
  36. Khalap N, Burioni R, Clementie M, Garry R and Dash S. Intracellular expression of recombinant human immunoglobulin (IgG1) against NS3 inhibits helicase activity and HCV replication in cell culture. Abstract submitted to the 8th International Symposium on Hepatitis C and Related Disorders.
  37. Ramesh Prabhu, Jane Myung, Robert Garry,Fredrick Regenstein, Srikanta Dash. Replication of full-length HCV 1a strain using an adenovirus that expresses T7 RNA polymerase. Hepatology, 2002; 36: 241A. Platform presentation at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, November 1-5, 2002, Boston, MA.
  38. Zhangtian Qi, Raj Kalkeri, Ramesh Prabhu, Robert Garry and Srikanta Dash. Stem-loop structures (II-IV) of the 5’ untranslated sequences are required for the expression of full- length hepatitis C virus. Hepatology 2002; 36: 406A. Poster presentation at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, November 1-5, 2002, Boston, MA.
  39. Zhangtian Qi, Cynthia Deluca, Ramesh Prabhu, Shamim Akhter, Robert Garry, Virendra Joshi, Fredrick G Regenstein and Srikanta Dash. Interferon inhibits hepatitis C virus replication by blocking viral RNA translation. Hepatology 2002; 36:881A. Platform presentation at the53rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, November 1-5, 2002, Boston, MA.
  40. Ramesh Prabhu, Padmaja Vital, Erik Flemington, Robert Garry, Frank Bastian and Srikanta Dash Development of small interfering RNA (siRNAs) against full-length hepatitis C virus 1a strain Platform presentation at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, A133, P-220, October 24-28, 2003, Boston, MA.
  41. Alfredo Panebra, Krishna Shah, Ramesh Prabhu, Frank Bastian, Robert F. Garry, Virendra Joshi, Salima Haque, Fredric G Regenstein, Steve Goodbourn and Srikanta Dash. Hepatitis C virus genomic and sub-genomic clones activate interferon-stimulated response element in Huh-7 cells. Poster presentation at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, October 24-28, A-990, P-633, 2003, Boston, MA.
  42. Alfredo Panebra, Krishna Shah, Ramesh Prabhu, Frank Bastian, Robert F. Garry, Virendra Joshi, Salima Haque, Fredric G Regenstein, Richard Elliott and Srikanta Dash. IFN-alpha 2b inhibits internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of green fluorescence protein from six different HCV genotypes. Poster presentation at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, A- 974, P-625, October 24-28, 2003, Boston, MA.
  43. Ramesh Prabhu, Robert Garry, Frank O Bastian, Srikanta Dash. SiRNA targeted to the second stem-loop of 5’untranslated region effectively inhibits expression of all major HCV strains. Platform presentation at the 55th Annual Meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Hepatology,A-268, P-282,10/29/04-11/7/04.
  44. Sidhartha Hazari, Frank O Bastian, Robert Garry and Srikanta Dash. Translational regulation of HCV-IRES mRNA in interferon treated Huh-7 cells. Poster presentation at the 55th Annual Meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, Hepatology, A-619, P-433A, October29-November 2, 2004.
  45. Sidhartha Hazari, Lizeth Taylor, Robert Garry, Ronald Loftig and Srikanta Dash. Lower activation of ISRE promoter among cell clones replicating HCV sub-genomic RNA leads to interferon resistance. Oral presentation at the 56th Annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver disease (AASLD), San Francisco, CA, USA, November 11- 15, 2005. Received travel grant from the American Association Cancer Research.
  46. Hazari S, Garry RF, Wakita T and Dash S. Hepatitis C virus infection and replication in Huh-7 cells with reduced interferon signaling. Poster presentation at the 57th Annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, October 27-31, 2006, Boston, MA.
  47. Hazari S, Garry RF, Wakita T and Dash S. Green fluorescence based assay for hepatitis C virus replication and infectivity in cell culture. Poster presentation at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American association for the study of liver diseases, November 2-6, 2007, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA.
  48. Hazari S, Garry R, He X-S, Ji X, Greenberg H, Dash S. Interferon alpha induced transcription of mRNA and miRNA is higher in the sensitive replicon compared to resistant replicon. Poster-328, 14th International symposium on hepatitis C virus and related viruses. 9- 13 September 2007, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
  49. Dash S, Garry RF and Hazari S. Mouse Model for Hepatitis C Virus Replication. Oral Presentation at the Hong Kong-Shanghai International Liver Congress, June 12-15, Hong Kong.
  50. Henry Hefler, Sidhartha Hazari, Kamila Jackson, Tara Ooms, Mathew Burrow, Tarun Mandal, Salima Haque, Robert F Garry, Louis Balart and Srikanta Dash. Mouse Model for Hepatitis C Virus Replication. Oral presentation at 59th annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, November 4-7, 2008, San Francisco, CA.
  51. Dally N, GageT, Hazari S, Haque S, Dash S. Identification of cellular micro RNAs that block IFN-alpha action against hepatitis C virus IRGs mediated translation. Selected as a Presidential Poster of Distinction at the 59th annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, October 31-November 4, 2008, San Francisco, CA.
  52. Partha K Chandra, Sidhartha Hazari, Massimo Clementi, Roberto Burioni and Srikanta Dash. Intracytoplasmic delivery of a recombinant IgG1 antibody by adenovirus vector inhibits replication of two different HCV strains. Oral presentation at 59th annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, November 4-7, 2008, San Francisco, CA.
  53. Maria Samara, Sidhartha hazari, Salima Haque, Fredric G Regenstein , Luis A Balart, Sander Florman, Hansjorg Hauser, Mario Koster and Srikanta Dash. Impaired nuclear translocation of Stat-1 and Stat-2 proteins in IFN-resistant HCV replicon cell lines with defective Jak-Stat Pathway. Oral Presentation at the 60th annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, October 30 to November 3, 2009.
  54. Chandra P, Kundu A, Hazari S, Haque S, Florman S, Regenstein FG, Balart LA, Garry RF, Mandal T and Dash S. Complete inhibition of HCV RNA replication in an interferon resistant replicon cell line by multiple siRNA delivered by nanosomes. Oral Presentation at the 60th annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, October 30 to November 3, 2009.
  55. Gunduz F, Hazari S, Chandra P, Datta S, Samara M, Regenstein FG and Dash S. Effect of hepatocellular steatosis on hepatitis C virus replication and antiviral response. Poster presentation at the 60th annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, October 30 to November 3, 2009.
  56. Gunduz F, Mallikarjun C, Hazari S, Poat B, Regenstein F, Dash S and Balart L. Interferon alpha induced intrahepatic pStat1 levels in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Poster presentation at the 61st annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, BOSTON. MA, October 29 to November 2, 2010.
  57. Poat B, Hazari S, Gunduz F, Chandra PK, Bao L, Stone J, Wu T, Bruce D, Cohen AJ, Bohorquez HE, Loss GE, Dash S. Impaired Jak-Stat signaling of interferon-alpha in chronically infected liver tissue. Poster presentation at the 61st annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, BOSTON. MA, October 29 to November 2, 2010.
  58. Chandra S, Chandra PK, Gunduz F, hazari S, Poat B and Dash S. Hepatitis C virus infects human stellate cells (LX-2) and induce expression of alpha smoth muscle actin and type I collagen. Poster presentation at the 61st annual meeting of the American Association for the study of liver diseases, BOSTON, MA, October 29 to November 2, 2010.
  59. Hazari S, Nayak S, Chandra PK, Kaushal D, Balart LA and Dash S. Robust antiviral activity of lambda interferon (IL-29) against HCV in interferon alpha resistant Huh-7 cells with a defective Jak-Stat signaling. Hepatology A924. 62nd AASLD meeting abstracts, November 4- 8, 2011, San Francisco, CA.
  60. Chandra PK, Hazari S, Gunduz F, Chandra S, Bao L,Garry RF, Balart LA and Dash S. Hepatitis C virus infection induces ER-stress and autophagy response down regulates IFNAr1 leading to the defective Jak-Stat signaling and impaired IFN-a response. Hepatology A928. 62nd AASLD meeting abstracts, November 4-8, 2011, San Francisco, CA.
  61. Chandra S, Hazari S, Chandra PK, Gunduz F, Bao L, Balart L and Dash S. Ribavirin and IFN-alpha each inhibits HCV IRES mediated translation and synergistically inhibits HCV replication in cells with a functional Jak-Stat pathway. Hepatology A935. 62nd AASLD meeting abstracts, November 4-8, 2011, San Francisco, CA.
  62. Aboulnasr F, Gunduz F, Chandra PK, Baker DP, Balart LA and Dash S. Free fatty acids induce endoplasmic stress and block the antiviral activity of interferon-alpha against hepatitis C virus in cell culture. Poster presentation at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases, Novermber 9-13, 2012, Hynes Convention Center, Boston. MA. Hepatology A1727, P-996A.
  63. Chandra PK, Song K, Baker DP, Liu S, Hagedorn CH, Fuchs SY, Shores N, Wu T, Balart LA and Dash S. Persistently infected hepatitis C virus cell culture impairs Type I but not the type III IFN signaling. Platform Presentation at the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, November 1-5, 2013, Washington DC.
  64. Kurt R, Chandra PK, Aboulnasr F, Shores N, Panigrahi R, Ferraris P and Dash S and Balart LA. Type III IFN (interferon lambda) induces hepatitis C virus clearance in Type I (interferon alpha) resistant free fatty acid HCV cell culture. Poster Presentation at the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, November 1- 5, 2013, Washington DC.
  65. Panigrahi R, Hazari S, Chandra S, Chandra PK, Cameron CE, Huang Z, Balart LA and Dash S. Interferon alpha and ribavirin combination synergistically inhibit HCV IRES translation at the level of polyribosome formation. Poster Presentation at the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, November 1-5, 2013, Washington DC.
  66. Srikanta Dash, Partha K Chandra, Nathan Shores, Tong Wu, Luis A Balart. IFN-alpha/RBV resistance mechanism in persistently infected HCV cell culture. Oral presentation at the International Workshop on Antiviral Drug Resistance. 2014, June 3-7, Berlin, Germany.
  67. Chandra PK, Gunduz F, Hazari S, Kurt R, Panigrahi R, Poat B, Bruce DR, Cohen AJ, Bohorquez HE, Carmody I, Loss G, Wu T, Balart LA and Dash S. Impaired expression of Type I and Type II interferon-receptors in HCV infected chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis. Poster Presentation at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston, 2014.
  68. Ferraris P, Chandra PK, Panigrahi R, Aboulnar F, Kurt R, Pawlotsky JM, Wilken L, Wu T, Balart LA and Dash Impaired inhibition of HCV IRES translation by Type I and Type III interferon in human hepatoma cellline with an unfavorable SNP rs12979860 of IL-28B gene. Poster Presentation at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston, 2014.
  69. Panigrahi R, Chandra PK, Ferraris P, Kurt R, Imagen C, Tong Wu, Balart LA and Dash S. Persistently infected HCV cell culture impairs antiviral activity through clathrin mediated trafficking of ENT1. Poster Presentation at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston, 2014.
  70. Kurt R, Chandra PK, Aboulnasr F, Shores N, Panigrahi R, Ferraris P, Tong Wu, Balart LA and Dash S. Chaperone-mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture. Poster Presentation at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston,2014.
  71. Dash S, Chava S, Chandra PK, Panigrahi R, Ferraris PK, Liu J, Chang H, Buell J and Marin JJ. Organic cation transporter-1 (OCT-1) dependent and independent mechanisms of sorafenib resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Poster presentation at the EACR-AACR-SIC conference on Anticancer Drug Action and Drug ResistanceL from Cancer Biology to the Clinic, 20-23 June , 2015, Florence, ITALY.
  72. Panigrahi R, Chandra PK, Ferraris P, Aboulnasr F, Chava S, Wu T and Dash S. Defective mTOR- TFEB signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma. The American Association for the Study of the Liver Disease (AASLD) Meeting 2015, San Francisco, November 13-17.
  73. Chava S, Chandra PK, Panigrahi R, Ferraris P, Aboulnasr F, Liu J, Marin JJ, Thung SN, Wu T and Dash S. Organic Cation transporter-1 (OCT1) dependent hepatocellular carcinomas. The American Association for the Study of the Liver Disease (AASLD) Meeting 2015, San Francisco, November 13-17.
  74. Aboulnasr F, Hazari S, Chandra PK, Ferraris P, Panigrahi R, Chava S, Kurt R, Song K, Dash A, Balart LA, Wu T and Dash S. IFN-lambda inhibits miRNA-122 transcription through a Stat3-HNF4a inflammatory feedback loop in an IFN-alpha resistant HCV cell culture system. The American Association for the Study of the Liver Disease (AASLD) Meeting 2015, San Francisco, November 13-17.

   Areas of Expertise  

   Research  

The liver is the largest solid organ of the human body. It is located on the right side of the abdomen behind the ribs. The liver is responsible for protein, carbohydrate, lipid metabolism, secretes bile, detoxifies harmful substances, purifies our blood, manufactures vital nutrients, and helps with blood clotting. The liver is often affected by primary malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (derived from hepatocytes) and cholangiocarcinoma (derived from bile ducts). According to the National Cancer Institute, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 4th common cancer in the world. It is also called primary liver cancer because it arises from hepatocyte, which is the major cell type of the liver. The cause of hepatocellular carcinoma is unknown but contributing factors include viral hepatitis (hepatitis B and hepatitis C), cirrhosis, hemochromatosis, and toxins (especially aflatoxins) found in foods in parts of Africa and Asia. This organ is also more frequently affected by secondary malignant diseases derived from a variety of cancers such as colorectal carcinoma, carcinomas of the stomach, pancreas, lungs, breast and malignant melanomas.

Hepatitis C virus is a blood borne infectious disease that affects the liver. The majority of people infected with this virus end up with a chronic infection.  Since the infection does not have any symptoms, many individuals do not know that they carry the virus until it has already done significant liver damage 10 to 20 years later. Chronic HCV infection damages the liver and causes liver cirrhosis and cancer.  There is no treatment for liver cirrhosis and cancer. Most of these patients seek liver transplantation. There are no vaccines available currently for the prevention of HCV infection. The FDA approved treatment for chronic HCV infection is alpha interferon, ribavirin along with one of the protease inhibitors. Many patients develop resistance to this interferon -based therapy. There are approximately 170 million people infected with HCV worldwide, including 1.7 million in the United States. The social, medical and economic burden of HCV infection is enormous. The molecular details of why some patients do not respond to standard interferon therapy are currently unknown. This could be partly related either to specific hepatitis C viral strains that show persistent infection in the liver by inhibiting interferon response, or defects in the host cell response to interferon. The patients who do not respond to interferon treatment, experience long-term inflammation of liver and are at increased risk of developing liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Pathology hepatitis research lab along with Dr. Balart and Dr. Schores investigate the cause of HCV resistance to current treatment. Research program focused on two major aspects of the disease namely: (i) To understand the mechanism of interferon resistance and virus persistence and to find out why some patients respond to treatment and why some do not. Understand how the IL-28B genotype contributes to the treatment clearance. (ii) We have developd alternative intracellular treatment approach using combinatorial siRNAs to treat chronic HCV infection that do not responds to interferon.

The mechanism(s) by which HCV cause liver cancer is complex. During the last few years our focus has been to prevent HCV-related hepatocellular carcinomas by developing an effective strategy to inhibit virus replication and production. We have been able to successfully grow hepatitis C virus outside the liver in a cell culture. We demonstrated that this culture is infectious since viral particles derived from HCV-cell culture cause persistent infection in a chimpanzee model. To visualize the replication of hepatitis C virus in living cells, scientists in our hepatitis research laboratory has fused it to green fluorescence protein in frame using one of the non-structural proteins of HCV (NS5A).  

Liver cells replicating this virus emit a green fluorescent signal when exposed to a specific wavelength of light. This allows direct visualization of the tiny microscopic viral factories inside the cells (see the picture on the left). HCV-cell culture models are currently being utilized in our laboratory to understand the antiviral action of interferon alpha and mechanisms of interferon and ribavirin resistance. We have developed an intracellular treatment approach to eliminate chronic infections using genetically engineered recombinant human antibodies targeted to the viral NS3 helicase enzyme and small hairpin RNAs targeted to the highly conserved 5'UTR region. In the future, our research will lead to an effective intracellular treatment approach for chronic hepatitis C patients who are not responding to interferon therapy. This will reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas due to hepatitis C. The hepatitis research laboratory is also conduct basic research to understand the mechanism of cancer metastasis to the liver (secondary liver cancer) in order to develop effective therapeutic strategy that will prevent secondary liver cancer. The significance of these accomplishments has been recognized by my peers through the publication records and continuous support from the National Cancer Institute for the laboratory.

   Honors & Awards  

Awards, Honors and Memberships in Honor Societies

  • 2008 Identification of cellular microRNAs that block IFN-alpha action against hepatitis C virus IRES mediated translation has been selected as a Presidential Poster of Distinction during the 59th Annual Meeting of the AASLD, October 31-November 1, 2008, held in San Francisco, California.
  • 2007 Invited author for the Springer Book: Hepatitis C Virus Diseases: Immunobiology and Clinical Applications edited by Emlio Jirillo,MD.
  • 2007 Charlotte Gayer Foundation, New York.
  • 2006 Mauverney Research Excellence Award for poster- presentation sponsored by Tulane Cancer Center
  • 2004 Mauverney Research Excellence Award for poster- presentation sponsored by Tulane Cancer Center, 2004 and 2006 2004 AASLD Best Poster Award.
  • 1996-99 Liver Scholar Award by the American Liver Foundation,
  • 1992-93 Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award by the American Liver Foundation to Study of Hepatitis B Virus Receptor on Hepatocytes
  • 1990 Young Scientists Award sponsored by the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Indonesia, Jakarta, February.
  • 1978-85 National Loan Scholarship sponsored by the Ministry of Education Government of Orissa, India

Membership in Professional and Scientific Societies

  • Regular member, International Liver Cancer Association (ILCA) Member, American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
  • Member, American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) Member, American Society of Investigative Pathology (ASIP)
  • American Association of Microbiology (ASM)
  • American Association for Advancement of Sciences (AAAS)
  • American Liver Foundation (ALF)
  • Program Member of the Tulane Cancer Center
  • Program Member of the Louisiana Cancer Consortium
  • Faculty Member, Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences at Tulane
  • Program Member of Tulane Infectious Disease Center
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Associate Editor, Virology Journal, Biomed Central
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Hepatocellular Carcinoma, DOVE Press
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Antiviral Research and Therapy, Noble Research Group
  • Editorial Board, World J of Gastroenterology Editorial Board, World J of Hepatology Editorial Board, Journal of Viral Hepatitis Associate Editor, Frontiers Microbiology

Scientific Journal Ad-hoc Reviewer

  • Journal of Virology
  • Cancer
  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology
  • Journal of Infectious Disease
  • Journal of Medical Virology
  • American Journal of Pathology
  • Journal of General Virology
  • Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Liver International
  • Virology Journal
  • Journal of Molecular Biology Reports
  • Journal of Proteomics
  • Journal of Viral Hepatitis
  • Microscopy Research and Technique
  • PLOS ONE
  • Journal of Clinical Investigation Scientific Reports
  • Translational Research

Editorial Positions

  • Associate Editor: Online Virology Journal, Frontiers in Microbiology

NIH Grant Reviewer

  • Center Grant: Reviewer Special Emphasis Panel for Drug Development for Hepatitis C at the National Institute of Health, NIAAID
  • SPORE Review panel NCI
  • Adhoc reviewer of numerous NIH study sections
  • Adhoc Reviewer. Hepatobiliary Pathophysiology Study Section. The National Institute of Health, NIDDK
  • Adhoc Reviewer Topics in Virology Study Section, National Institute of Health, NIAID
  • Adhoc Reviewer of Experimental Virology Study Section at the National Institute of Health, NIAID
  • Reviewer Special Emphasis Panel for Drug Development for Hepatitis C, at the National Institute of Health, NIAID
  • Reviewer Hepatology Seed Grants, American Liver Foundation
  • Reviewer NIH Grants: Microbiological and Immunological Sciences Special Emphasis Panel Study Section for Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)
  • Grant Reviewer, The Welcome Trust Foundation, London, United Kingdom
  • Grant Reviewer, United States-Israel Bi-National Science Foundation, ISRAEL
  • Grant Reviewer: HCV NIH Challenge Grants, NIH
  • Grant Reviewer: Bioengineering Sciences and Technology Challenge Grants, NIH
  • Grant Reviewer: Topics in Virology and Viral Pathogenesis, year 2011-2014, NIAID
  • SPORE Review Panel, National Cancer Institute, year 2012, 2013
  • NCI Review Panel: Omnibus: Oncogenesis, Cancer Risk and Prevention, 2014
  • NIH Special Emphasis Panel: Hepatitis C Cooperative Research Centers: Immunity to HCV infections (U19), 2015
  • Adhoc reviewer, Virology A panel for the year, 2015, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Reviewer: Member conflict: Topics in Virology 2016, 7-22, ZRG IDM-X.
  • Reviewer, NCI Special Emphasis for Clinical and Translational Research, 2016, 2017

Past Research Funding

  • 2008-2015
    NIH-R01: CA127481, Principal Investigator
    Hepatocarcinogenesis Secondary to Hepatitis C
    (With No Cost extension)
  • 2007-2008
    Charlotte Gayer Foundation, New York
    Intracellular immunization strategy to inhibit HCV related liver Cancer, Principal Investigator
    Bridge Funding for NCI R-21: CA129481
  • 2005-2008
    R21: DK070551
    HIV-1 Tat modulation of HCV replication and pathogenesis
    Co-Investigator
  • 2001-2006
    NIH/RO1 CA89121, Principal Investigator
    Hepatitis C Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma
  • 1997-2002
    NIH/RO1 CA54576, Principal Investigator
    Association of Hepatitis C Virus with Hepatocellular Carcinoma
  • 1997-1998
    Principal Investigator
    In vitro Inactivation of HCV Infectivity
    Centeon Pharma, (GMBH), Germany.
  • 1997-2009
    Principal Investigator
    Tulane Cancer Center Matching Funds
    Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows.
  • 1996-1999
    Principal Investigator
    In Vitro Studies of Hepatitis C Virus
    Funded by the American Liver Foundation-Franklin Brooks Memorial Liver Scholar Award, 1996-1999
  • 1995-1996
    Principal Investigator
    To Test the Transforming Ability of Hepatitis C Virus Using Well- Differentiated Immortalized Liver Derived Cell Line
    Cancer Association of Greater New Orleans (CAGNO)
  • 2009-2001
    NCI-R21: CA129776, Principal Investigator
    Intracellular Immunization Strategy to inhibit HCV related liver cancer
  • 2006-2010
    Supplemental Award: NIH/RO1 CA89121,
    Principal Investigator
    Hepatitis C Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma
  • 2007-2010
    Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium (LCRC) Pilot Grant
    Interaction of mammary carcinoma cells with the liver microvasculature
    Principal Investigator (Tulane Side)
  • 2006-2010
    NCI-Tulane-Xavier, P-20 Partnership Pilot Grant
    Multifunctional Engineered Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery Systems for Breast Cancer
    Principal Investigator (Tulane Side)
  • 2007-2009 LCRC Competitive Advantage Funds for R01 and R-21
  • 2007-2009 Tulane Enhancement Fund (Phase-I and Phase-II)
  • 2008-2009 Tulane Cancer Center Matching Funds

Active Research Funding

  • 2013-2018 NIHR01: AI103106
    Principal Investigator
    IL-28B Genotype and HCV treatment clearance
  • 2012-2018 NIH R01: CA089121
    Principal Investigator
    Hepatitis C Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Academic Commitees at Tulane University and School of Medicine (Past 5 Years)

  • Personnel and Honors Committee, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, 2013-2016
  • Senate Committee on Equal Opportunity of the Tulane School of Medicine, 2008-2011
  • Member of the Tulane-Xavier Planning Grant for Minority Institution/ Cancer Center Collaboration (P-20)
  • Tulane Medical School Student Interview Committee for the years 2001-2005
  • Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Studies (Thesis Advisory Committee)
  • Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Program Applicants (Interviewer)
  • Michael A Gerber Memorial Fund Committee, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Departmental Representative to Biosafety Committee Departmental Radiation Safety Officer
  • Pathology Department Safety Representative
  • Tulane New Faculty Hiring, Interviewer
  • Program Member of the Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans
  • Program Member of the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium (LCRC), New Orleans

LCRC Faculty

Asim B. Abdel-Mageed DVM
Molecular Signaling
Tulane University School of Medicine
Asim Abdel-Mageed DVM PhD
Molecular Signaling
Tulane University School of Medicine
Ashok Aiyar PhD
Immunology, Infection, and Inflamation
LSU Health - New Orleans
Amir Al-Khami PhD
Molecular Genetics
LSU Health - New Orleans
Suresh K. Alahari PhD
Molecular Signaling
LSU Health - New Orleans
Mehnaaz Ali PhD
Drug Discovery
Xavier University
Gurdial Arora PhD
Drug Discovery
Xavier University
Diego Aviles MD
Immunology, Infection, and Inflamation
LSU Health - New Orleans
Wayne L. Backes PhD
Molecular Genetics
LSU Health - New Orleans